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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2018-105
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2018-105
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  20 Sep 2018

20 Sep 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Earth System Science Data (ESSD) and is expected to appear here in due course.

Two multi-temporal datasets to track the enhanced landsliding after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

Xuanmei Fan1, Gianvito Scaringi1, Fan Yang1, Guillem Domènech1, Xiaojun Guo2, Lanxin Dai1, Chaoyang He1, Qiang Xu1, and Runqiu Huang1 Xuanmei Fan et al.
  • 1State Key Laboratory of Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment Protection, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu, 610059, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Mountain Hazards and Surface Process, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu, 610041, China

Abstract. We release two datasets that track the enhanced landsliding induced by the Mw 7.9 2008 Wenchuan earthquake over a portion of the Longmen mountains, at the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau (Sichuan, China). The first dataset is a geo-referenced multi-temporal polygon-based inventory of pre- and coseismic landslides, post-seismic remobilisations of coseismic landslide debris, and post-seismic landslides (new failures). The inventory covers 462.5km2 in the earthquake's epicentral area, from 2005 to 2015. The second dataset records the debris flows that occurred from 2008 to 2017 in a larger area (~17,000km2), together with information on their triggering rainfalls recorded by a network of rain gauges. For some well-monitored event, we provide detailed information on rainfall, discharge, flow depth and density. The datasets can be used to analyse, at various scales, the patterns of enhanced landsliding caused by the earthquake. They can be compared to inventories relative to past or new earthquakes or other triggers to reveal common or distinctive controlling factors. To our knowledge, no other inventories that track the temporal evolution of earthquake-induced mass wasting have been made freely available thus far. Our datasets are available at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1405490. We also encourage other researchers to share their datasets to facilitate research on post-seismic geological hazards.

Xuanmei Fan et al.
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Xuanmei Fan et al.
Data sets

Two multi-temporal datasets to track the enhanced landsliding after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake G. Domènech, F. Yang, X. Guo, X. Fan, G. Scaringi, L. Dai, C. He, Q. Xu, and R. Huang https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1405490

Xuanmei Fan et al.
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Short summary
Large earthquakes cause major disturbances to mountain landscapes. They trigger many landslides that can form deposits of debris on steep slopes and channels. Rainfalls can remobilise these deposits and generate large and destructive flow-like landslides and floods. We release two datasets that track a decade of landsliding following the 2008 magnitude 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake in China. These data are useful to quantify the role of major earthquakes in shaping mountain landscapes.
Large earthquakes cause major disturbances to mountain landscapes. They trigger many landslides...
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