Journal cover Journal topic
Earth System Science Data The data publishing journal
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 8.792 IF 8.792
  • IF 5-year value: 8.414 IF 5-year 8.414
  • CiteScore value: 8.18 CiteScore 8.18
  • SNIP value: 2.620 SNIP 2.620
  • SJR value: 4.885 SJR 4.885
  • IPP value: 7.67 IPP 7.67
  • h5-index value: 28 h5-index 28
  • Scimago H index value: 24 Scimago H index 24
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2018-127
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2018-127
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  22 Oct 2018

22 Oct 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Earth System Science Data (ESSD).

Field Investigations of Coastal Sea Surface Temperature Drop after Typhoon Passages

Dong-Jiing Doong1, Jen-Ping Peng2, and Alexander V. Babanin3 Dong-Jiing Doong et al.
  • 1Department of Hydraulic and Ocean Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
  • 2Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemuende (IOW), Rostock, Germany
  • 3Department of Infrastructure Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract. Sea surface temperature (SST) variability affects marine ecosystems, fisheries, ocean primary productivity, and human activities and is the primary influence on typhoon intensity. SST drops of a few degrees in the open ocean after typhoon passages have been widely documented; however, few studies have focused on coastal SST variability. The purpose of this study is to determine typhoon-induced SST drops in the near-coastal area (within 1km of the coast) and understand the possible mechanism. The results of this study were based on extensive field data analysis. Significant SST drop phenomena were observed at the Longdong buoy in northeastern Taiwan during 43 typhoons over the past 20 years (1998~2017). The mean SST drop (∆SST) after a typhoon passage was 6.1°C, and the maximum drop was 12.5°C (Typhoon Fungwong in 2008). The magnitude of SST drop was larger than most of the observations in the open ocean. The mean duration of SST drop was 24 hours, and on average, 26.1 hours were required for the SST to recover to the original temperature. The coastal SST drops at Longdong were correlated with the moving tracks of typhoons. When a typhoon passes south of Longdong, the strong and persistent longshore winds induce coastal upwelling and pump cold water up to the surface, which is the dominant cause of SST drops along the coast. In this study, it was determined that cold water mainly intruded from the Kuroshio subsurface in the Okinawa Trough, which is approximately 50 km from the observation site. The magnitude of coastal SST drops depends on the area of overlap between typhoons generating strong winds and the Kuroshio. The dataset used in this study can be accessed by https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.895002.

Dong-Jiing Doong et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 17 Dec 2018)
Status: open (until 17 Dec 2018)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Dong-Jiing Doong et al.
Data sets

SST observed during 43 typhoons by marine buoy in the coastal area from 1998 to 2017 D.-J. Doong https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.895002

Dong-Jiing Doong et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 252 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
222 25 5 252 3 3
  • HTML: 222
  • PDF: 25
  • XML: 5
  • Total: 252
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 22 Oct 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 22 Oct 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 252 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 252 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 18 Nov 2018
Download
Short summary
Sea water temperature has a major impact on human comfort and safety during swimming, surfing, and snorkeling activities and the marine ecosystems. The authors deployed marine buoys to collect meteo-oceanographic data for the government and found the temperature always drop significantly after typhoon passages. This rises the authors to study this phenomena. Presentation of the dataset gives the first understandings and can help to validate the numerical model to study the mechanism.
Sea water temperature has a major impact on human comfort and safety during swimming, surfing,...
Citation
Share