Journal cover Journal topic
Earth System Science Data The data publishing journal
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 8.792 IF 8.792
  • IF 5-year value: 8.414 IF 5-year 8.414
  • CiteScore value: 8.18 CiteScore 8.18
  • SNIP value: 2.620 SNIP 2.620
  • SJR value: 4.885 SJR 4.885
  • IPP value: 7.67 IPP 7.67
  • h5-index value: 28 h5-index 28
  • Scimago H index value: 24 Scimago H index 24
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2018-139
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2018-139
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  22 Nov 2018

22 Nov 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Earth System Science Data (ESSD).

Geology datasets of North America for use with ice sheet models

Evan J. Gowan, Lu Niu, Gregor Knorr, and Gerrit Lohmann Evan J. Gowan et al.
  • Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany

Abstract. The ice-substrate interface is an important boundary condition for ice sheet modelling. The substrate affects the ice sheet by allowing sliding through sediment deformation and accommodating the storage and drainage of subglacial water. We present three datasets with different geological parameters for the region that was covered by the ice sheets in North America, including Greenland and Iceland. The first dataset includes the distribution surficial sediments, which is separated into continuous, discontinuous and predominantly rock categories. The second dataset includes sediment grain size properties, which is divided into three classes: clay, silt and sand, based on the dominant grain size of the glacial sediments. The third dataset is the generalized bedrock geology. We demonstrate the utility of these datasets for governing ice sheet dynamics by using an ice sheet model with a simulation that extends through the last glacial cycle. Changes in ice thickness by up to 40% relative to a reference simulation happened when the shear friction angle was reduced to account for a weaker substrate. These datasets provide a basis to improve the basal boundary conditions in ice sheet models.

Gowan, E. J., Niu, L., Knorr, G., and Lohmann, G., 2018. Geology datasets of North America for use with ice sheet models, link to datafiles. PANGAEA, https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.895889

Evan J. Gowan et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 17 Jan 2019)
Status: open (until 17 Jan 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Evan J. Gowan et al.
Data sets

Geology datasets of North America for use with ice sheet models, link to datafiles. E. J. Gowan, L. Niu, G. Knorr, and G. Lohmann https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.895889

Evan J. Gowan et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 282 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
240 37 5 282 6 4
  • HTML: 240
  • PDF: 37
  • XML: 5
  • Total: 282
  • BibTeX: 6
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 22 Nov 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 22 Nov 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 259 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 259 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 14 Dec 2018
Download
Short summary
The speed in which ice sheets flow is largely controlled by the properties at the interface between the ice and the ground lying underneath. We present three datasets that detail the geological properties of the ground in North America, which was covered in ice 20 000 years ago. One includes the amount of sediment cover over the bedrock. Another dataset includes properties of how coarse this sediment is (i.e. if it is clay, silt or sandy). The third is the type of rock that is underlying the ice.
The speed in which ice sheets flow is largely controlled by the properties at the interface...
Citation
Share