Journal cover Journal topic
Earth System Science Data The data publishing journal
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 8.792 IF 8.792
  • IF 5-year value: 8.414 IF 5-year 8.414
  • CiteScore value: 8.18 CiteScore 8.18
  • SNIP value: 2.620 SNIP 2.620
  • SJR value: 4.885 SJR 4.885
  • IPP value: 7.67 IPP 7.67
  • h5-index value: 28 h5-index 28
  • Scimago H index value: 24 Scimago H index 24
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2018-143
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2018-143
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Review article 26 Nov 2018

Review article | 26 Nov 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Earth System Science Data (ESSD).

The ISC Bulletin as a comprehensive source of earthquake source mechanisms

Konstantinos Lentas, Domenico Di Giacomo, James Harris, and Dmitry Storchak Konstantinos Lentas et al.
  • International Seismological Centre, Pipers Lane, Thatcham, Berkshire, RG19 4NS, UK

Abstract. In this article we summarize the availability of earthquake source mechanisms in the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre (ISC). The bulletin in its current status contains ∼81,000 seismic events with only one associated mechanism solution, and ∼22,000 events with at least two associated source mechanisms. The main sources of earthquake mechanisms in the ISC Bulletin are reported solutions provided by data contributors, and ISC computed focal mechanisms based on first motion polarities. Given the importance of using pre-determined fault plane solutions in different types of studies, here we focus only on the reported mechanisms and we briefly discuss the methodologies adopted by major data providers to the ISC and investigate the intra-event variability of the source mechanisms. We conclude that the overall agreement among different earthquake focal mechanisms for the same event as reported by different sources can be as high as 90% for the majority of the cases. The earthquake source mechanisms discussed in this work are freely available within the ISC Bulletin websearch at http://doi.org/10.31905/D808B830.

Konstantinos Lentas et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 21 Jan 2019)
Status: open (until 21 Jan 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Konstantinos Lentas et al.
Konstantinos Lentas et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 203 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
177 23 3 203 3 4
  • HTML: 177
  • PDF: 23
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 203
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 26 Nov 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 26 Nov 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 179 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 177 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 14 Dec 2018
Download
Short summary
In this article we try to make aware the broad Geoscience community and and especially the Seismological community of the availability of earthquake source mechanisms in the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and encourage researchers to make use of this data set in future research. Moreover, we acknowledge the data providers and we encourage others to routinely submit their source mechanism solutions to the ISC.
In this article we try to make aware the broad Geoscience community and and especially the...
Citation
Share