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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2019-162
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2019-162
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: data description paper 09 Oct 2019

Submitted as: data description paper | 09 Oct 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Earth System Science Data (ESSD).

Marine carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2): a compilation of measurements in seawater and the marine boundary layer

Sinikka T. Lennartz1,a, Christa A. Marandino1, Marc von Hobe2, Meinrat O. Andreae3,4, Kazushi Aranami5, Elliot Atlas6, Max Berkelhammer7, Heinz Bingemer8, Dennis Booge1, Gregory Cutter9, Pau Cortes10, Stefanie Kremser11, Cliff Law12, Andrew Marriner12, Rafel Simó10, Birgit Quack1, Günther Uher13, Huixiang Xie14, and Xiaobin Xu15 Sinikka T. Lennartz et al.
  • 1GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Biogeochemistry, Düsternbrooker Weg 20, 24105 Kiel
  • 2Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-7, Jülich, Germany
  • 3Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, P.O. Box 3060, D-55020 Mainz, Germany
  • 4Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego,La Jolla, CA 92093-0230, USA
  • 5Hokkaido University, Japan
  • 6University of Miami, Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, FL, USA
  • 7University of Illinois at Chicago, Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Chicago, IL, USA
  • 8Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Institut für Atmosphäre und Umwelt, Frankfurt, Germany
  • 9Old Dominion University, dept. Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, VA, USA
  • 10Institut de Ciències del Mar, Departament de Biologia Marina i Oceanografia, Barcelona, Spain
  • 11Bodeker Scientific, Alexandra, New Zealand
  • 12National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Wellington, New Zealand
  • 13School of Natural and Environmental Science, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, U. K.
  • 14Institut des sciences de la mer de Rimouski, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Rimouski, Canada
  • 15Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry of China Meteorology Administration, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Zhongguancun Nandajie 46, Beijing 100081, China
  • anow at: University of Oldenburg, Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Marine Geochemistry, Carl-von-Ossietzky-Straße 9-11, Oldenburg

Abstract. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2) are volatile sulfur gases that are naturally formed in seawater and exchanged with the atmosphere. OCS is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere, and CS2 is its most important precursor. They have gained interest due to their direct (OCS) or indirect (CS2 via oxidation to OCS) contribution to the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer. Furthermore, OCS serves as a proxy to constrain terrestrial CO2 uptake by vegetation. Oceanic emissions of both gases contribute a major part to their atmospheric concentration. Here we present a database of previously published and unpublished, mainly ship-borne measurements in seawater and the marine boundary layer for both gases, available at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.905430 (Lennartz et al., 2019). The database contains original measurements as well as data digitalized from figures in publications from 42 measurement campaigns, i.e. cruises or time series stations, ranging from 1982 to 2019. OCS data cover all ocean basins except for the Arctic Ocean, as well as all months of the year, while the CS2 dataset shows large gaps in spatial and temporal coverage. Concentrations are consistent across different sampling and analysis techniques for OCS. The database is intended to support the identification of global spatial and temporal patterns and to facilitate the evaluation of model simulations.

Sinikka T. Lennartz et al.
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Sinikka T. Lennartz et al.
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A database for carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2) in seawater and marine boundary layer. S. T. Lennartz, C. A. Marandino, M. von Hobe, M. O. Andreae, K. Aranami, E. L. Atlas, M. Berkelhammer, H. Bingemer, D. Booge, G. A. Cutter, P. Cortes, S. Kremser, C. S. Law, A. Marriner, R. Simo, B. Quack, G. Uher, H. Xie, and X. Xu https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.905430

Sinikka T. Lennartz et al.
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Short summary
Sulfur-containing trace gases in the atmosphere influence atmospheric chemistry and the energy budget of the Earth by forming aerosols. The ocean is an important source of the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere, carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and its most important precursor carbon disulfide (CS2). In order to assess global variability of the sea surface concentrations of both gases to calculate their oceanic emissions, we have compiled a database of existing shipborne measurements.
Sulfur-containing trace gases in the atmosphere influence atmospheric chemistry and the energy...
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